Tag Archives: lab safety

Office Noise Safety Study Results Have Bearing for Lab Safety Too

Many studies on standard office work environments have little correlation with the lab environment — but there are exceptions to every rule. The results of a recent study of 1,200 employees and executives, conducted by Oxford Economics and Plantronics, reveal some helpful understandings about workplace noise that impacts lab safety as well as the office milieu.

Focusing without Interruptions

One goal of the study was to examine the impact of open-plan workspaces, which are increasingly the norm for office construction. Since many labs feature open-plan workspaces, the results of this study are particularly relevant for lab safety. The study revealed one of the most important priorities for workers was the ability to focus without interruptions. Many of the perks and amenities, such as free food and a place to relax, were much less important than the ability to work effectively.

Unfortunately, open office plans do not facilitate that ability to focus. Conversations amongst colleagues and the compound effects of simple sounds like drawers closing and technology humming have created a noisy workspace where employees find it difficult to concentrate. Furthermore, executives — who have retained their private offices — are not aware of the prevalence of both noise and employee discomfort with it.

Millennials and Lab Safety

Another aspect of this study focused on the role of technology and constant connectivity. The survey included 300 Millennial employees who were more likely than their older colleagues to find noise — especially ambient noise — to be a distraction at work. They are also more likely to take steps to avoid that noise, either through listening to music on headsets or leaving the office in order to find a quieter place to work.

In the lab environment, both of those finding could cause problems. From a lab safety perspective, headsets that can drown out ambient noise could also prevent the wearer from hearing words spoken by others. In the case of a lab safety accident, this can have serious consequences. Obviously, lab workers cannot leave the lab and still get their work done since their job often relies on sensitive, integrated equipment that must remain in the lab rather than moved around in the way that a laptop can be picked up and taken to another part of the office complex.

Technology and Noise Safety

Another interesting finding in this study relates to the role of technology in the workplace. Technology integration is, in the study’s words, “a work in progress.” Employees are expected to stay connected with the office on their tech devices at all times, but a full 40% say that there is no seamless integration between their home and office tools. At one level, this is less of a concern for the lab environment and lab safety because staff are limited in what they can take home to work on.

On the other hand, the constant push for connectivity can become in itself a lab safety issue. The study found that connectivity breeds compulsive behavior, which can lead to burnout. This burnout can have severe lab safety consequences when levels of noise and distractions lead to unfocused work and workplace accidents. Employees who retreat into their tech devices to escape noise are more likely to be distracted by their tech and oblivious to what is happening around them.

The results of this study confirm the need to address noise safety by minimizing noise in the lab. This is why our dedicated lab furniture includes vacuum pump enclosures that decrease noise by 75%. To learn more about how noise safety measures and dedicated lab furniture can make a difference in your lab, contact Tim Hawkins at 1-888-669-1233 or by email:  tim.hawkins@farhawk.com.

 

Lab Safety Issues Aren’t Always Obvious or Catastrophic

We frequently talk about safety in the lab on our blog and periodically share news about accidents that bring attention to the issue of lab safety. We do this to remind busy researchers that some safety issues can be addressed by investing in high-quality dedicated lab furniture. Other safety issues are sometimes not as simple.

Not All Accidents are Obvious

And not all accidents are catastrophic. Some of the most insidious lab accidents, in fact, occur over time. As we have pointed out in the past, even moderate levels of noise in the lab can have hidden, adverse effects on the health and well-being of staff. Long-term noise exposure wears down a body’s system in multiple ways, causing stress and a multitude of silent secondary illnesses like cardiovascular disease and sleep loss.

A Recent Insidious Lab Accident

Noise is not the only insidious cause of lab incidents. As we learned recently, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University in New York experienced a lab safety accident that could have resulted in the loss of her sight. She was inspecting agarose gels under UV light, not wearing goggles, and did not know that a simple plastic cover on the UV light screen needed to be closed to protect both her eyes and her skin.

Over the course of just a few months, she suffered significant damage to her eyes. A trip to the hospital and many visits with a specialist followed. Two incorrect diagnoses slowed the process of addressing this lab safety issue. While the good news is that this student suffered no long-term permanent sight damage, the accident clearly illustrates the dangers of hidden lab safety issues.

Improving Lab Safety with Guidelines, Notices, and Meetings

Fortunately, Columbia University took a series of concrete steps to address the causes of this lab accident. First, they updated their existing lab safety guidelines to include safety information and precautions related to ultraviolet equipment. At each UV workstation, they placed goggles in a prominent location and added warning signs about UV dangers.

They also focused on conversation and collaboration. They held a series of meetings with staff from the university’s office of environmental health and safety. Those meetings focused on both the specific concerns of working in that particular lab and on the identification of general hazards. Lab workers also met together and discussed the accident. Then they went further. Each person shared which lab safety hazards they focused on, recognizing that no one person usually considers everything. By doing this, every staff member heard about the variety of hazards within the lab.

Including Dedicated Lab Furniture in the Lab Safety Conversation

Hopefully some member of that university lab team mentioned noise as a lab safety issue. Like UV light, noise is often taken for granted in a lab because its dangers aren’t obvious. This is why we designed our MS dedicated lab furniture with two vacuum pump enclosures that eliminate the noise from those pumps by 75%. To learn more about how dedicated lab furniture can prevent insidious lab accidents, contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233.

The Ubiquitous Decibel: Noise Safety Uses and Abbreviations

Workers, including lab personnel, tend to develop their own internal lingo in professional settings, where colleagues often work alongside each other for years. While lab shorthand can be useful—and sometimes even entertaining—it’s no substitute for clear communication using well-defined terms, especially where lab safety is concerned.

In a prior post, we took a look at the history and early usage of the decibel, a humble and ubiquitous term that’s used in many conversations about noise safety in the lab. This time around we want to consider some of the ways decibel measurements are used in scientific situations. We’ll also cover some of the most common decibel abbreviations, which could figure into lab safety discussions concerning noise.

The Pressure of Sound

Decibels are used to measure sound in a surprising number of capacities. As we discussed previously, humans often perceive noise in terms of intensity. Particularly loud noise has been described, for example, as “a wall of sound.” Sound intensity or “sound pressure level” (SPL) is measured in decibels (dB). A measurement of 0 dB corresponds to an SPL of 0.0002 microbars, which is the point at which humans without hearing loss are able to perceive a sound.

Since our ears’ hearing capacity, as well as decibel measurements, increase logarithmically (by a factor of 10), 120 dB—which is beyond the noise safety level of 85 dBA, as determined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration—describes a change in sound pressure level of  compared to the 0 dB threshold level.

But the dB isn’t just used for measuring sound. For example, amateur radio is another place where decibels matter. Electronic and radio circuits must be able to handle signal levels that vary by many orders of magnitude. High frequency (HF) band signal strength is measured in S units, which correspond to a change in strength of between 5 and 6 dB. However, most amateur radios are not calibrated to the high degree necessary in modern lab equipment, and the standard change in signal strength of one S unit is generally considered to be 4 dB.

Abbreviations Matter

Sound and amateur radio are just two examples of decibels in action, but there are actually more uses. You will note that in many circumstances, the “dB” is followed by an additional abbreviation (as in the OSHA noise safety limit mentioned above). Such abbreviations indicate a specific reference value. For example, power levels are given in dBm, where “m” stands for milliwatt. Here, 0 dBm corresponds to 1 milliwatt of power, while 10 dBm correlates to 10 milliwatts. These reference numbers are frequently used to make system calculations easier and to indicate which capacity the dB measurement is being used in.

Noise Safety and dBA

The decibel suffix that occurs most frequently in our work at IonBench involves an appended “A”—written dBA, dBa, or dB(a). This stands for “adjusted” and is the relative noise safety level as perceived by the human ear. “A” refers to a necessary adjustment to reduce the decibel values of sounds at low frequencies, in comparison to unweighted decibels at higher frequencies. This adjustment is made because the human ear is less sensitive to low audio frequencies, especially below 1,000 Hz.

Talking Lab Safety

We hope you have found this decibel primer helpful. We know that sometimes the human perception of an indefinable “wall of sound” can make it difficult to discuss aspects of noise safety. Perhaps this overview of decibels can help facilitate internal lab discussions going forward, making lab safety conversations easier to have and to understand.

If you have further questions about decibels or the dedicated lab furniture we’ve crafted to minimize sound hazards in your lab, contact Tim Hawkins today at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233.

The Decibel: An Important Term in Lab Safety

We talk a lot about noise in this blog, for very good reason: A quieter lab is a safer lab. Lab safety requires being able to easily hear and understand your fellow lab workers, so we engineer our dedicated lab furniture to make your lab quieter.

In order to talk about sound and noise, however, you need the proper terminology. The decibel, often abbreviated as dB, is a frequent term in posts where we talk about noise safety in the lab. Let’s take a closer look at the humble decibel—where it came from, what it means, and why it’s so ubiquitous in discussions about noise and lab safety.

History of the Term ‘Decibel’

Where does the term “decibel” comes from? Modern efforts to measure sound volume originated in the need to quantify signal loss over telephone lines and telegraph cables. Early terms included MSC (for miles of standard cable) and TU (for transmission unit).

Eventually, the Bell System renamed the TU as the decibel, classifying it as one-tenth (hence the “deci”) of a “bel” (which was named after Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone—The full scientific name of the bel is the Alexander Bell which explains why the B in “dB” is capitalized).

Understanding the Decibel

In the National Bureau of Standards Yearbook of 1931, decibel was defined as follows:

The decibel may be defined by the statement that two amounts of power differ by 1 decibel when they are in the ratio of 100.1 and any two amounts of power differ by N decibels when they are in the ratio of 10N(0.1). The number of transmission units expressing the ratio of any two powers is therefore ten times the common logarithm of that ratio.

The bel signifies the logarithm of a 10:1 ratio between two power quantities (the ratio of measured power to reference power), or the logarithm of a ratio between two field quantities (the ratio of the squares of measured field and reference field) of √10:1.

The Spread of Decibel Usage in Addressing Noise Safety Situations

Over the decades since, the decibel has become a common standard of measurement for a variety of situations, including assessing noise safety for labs and other workplace environments. The decibel measures acoustics (as a unit of sound pressure), perception (as a measurement of intensity for both sound and light), optics (to measure loss over an optical link), and electronics (to measure amplitude ratios).

As we’ve noted previously, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s noise safety standards are measured in decibels. While the International Committee for Weights and Measures declined to include the decibel in the International System of Units, it is recognized by other international bodies, including the International Electrotechnical Commission and the International Organization for Standardization.

Connecting the Decibel with Lab Safety

In terms of lab safety, fewer dBs of noise is an important goal. That is where our dedicated lab furniture can make a big difference. Like the decibel itself, human perception of sound—especially sounds that intensify annoyance or hinder efficiency—seems to increase almost exponentially.

The sound of vacuum pumps and other mass spectrometry equipment can quickly contribute to noise safety hazards in the lab, especially when layered over the sounds of fume hoods, air conditioning and handling equipment, and essential conversations. However, our IonBenches are guaranteed to produce a 15 dBA reduction in roughing-pump noise. To find out other ways our dedicated lab furniture can enhance your lab’s safety, get in touch with Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233.

PS: Do you know why a letter like “A” often follows “dB”? Stay tuned for our next post, which will explain dB suffixes, as well as various ways to use the dB measurement.

Sound vs. Noise and When is Lab Safety Impacted?

Sounds are everywhere. Every environment on Earth has them. Some are natural, such as birds chirping or cicadas droning. Others are generated by the devices we humans have created. Both types of sounds, regardless of what causes them, can become an annoyance or even a danger depending on the circumstances.

That’s why sound—and particularly noise— represents a lab safety challenge and why we have carefully crafted our IonBench dedicated lab furniture to address noise safety concerns.

The Difference Between Sound and Noise

While you might not think of it in this manner, there is a simple way to distinguish between noise and sound: Noise is sound that you don’t wish to hear. To put it another way, when you have decided a sound is an annoyance, you should now classify it as noise.

Take, for example, jazz music being played in a lab. To some, it may be a beautiful sound. To others, who might need silence in order to focus on a demanding task or analysis, it might be classified as distracting noise. For still others, who might have relegated the sound of the music to background status, a sudden change in volume could result in startled surprise, perhaps resulting in a jerk of the hand or the head. In barely any time at all, that innocuous sound could have become noise that precipitates a lab safety incident.

How Noise Safety Definitions Vary

With so many subjective factors involved, it’s no surprise that definitions of what constitutes noise can vary. Individuals differ in their internal—often subconscious—understanding of what makes sound become noise. This can cause conflict in a lab. When one person’s sound is another person’s noise, noise safety discussions can become increasingly heated (potentially becoming noise safety hazards in and of themselves).

Consequently, it’s important to create a culture surrounding sound and noise that allows for individual differences. Attaching different definitions to elements of sound can help those discussions find common ground.

The 3 Physical Characteristics of Sound

There are three physical characteristics of sound that can be used to develop practical parameters for the discussion of noise safety:

Intensity: The magnitude of a sound, measured in decibels (dBA), delineates intensity.

Frequency: Sound frequency is more commonly referred to as tone or pitch and is measured in hertz. High-frequency sounds are often considered more annoying, while low-frequency sounds are perceived as being louder.

Temporality: Sounds vary in terms of fluctuation, continuity, and constancy or intermittence. A sound that varies in its temporal pattern is usually perceived as louder, because it has surprised the listener (as in the change of volume example noted earlier).

Addressing Lab Safety with Dedicated Lab Furniture

In many environments, various sounds can be used to drown out other sounds (such as when lab technicians use music to disguise the sound—experienced as noise—of mass spectrometry vacuum pumps or fume hoods). While this can be effective for some people, it creates potential lab safety issues when the total volume of noise increases beyond an acceptable or tolerable level for others.

Addressing such noise safety concerns is one of the reasons we created our IonBench MS, which comes with vacuum pump enclosures that guarantee a 15 dBA reduction in perceived noise. To learn more about this dedicated lab furniture and our commitment to noise safety in the lab, please contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233.

How Even Moderate Noise Can Impact Lab Safety

Most researchers know that labs can be noisy. Between the sounds of the various instruments in the lab, other machinery, multiple conversations, HVAC systems, and other sounds, it can be difficult to hear yourself think, much less the soft “pop” that precedes a sudden lab safety issue or accident. But that’s not all. It turns out that even moderate noise levels can compromise lab safety, according to an Australian researcher.

Why Does Moderate Noise Matter?

Most work spaces tend to focus on the lab safety hazards that arise when noise is technically loud enough to cause physical damage to our ears. Certainly there are specific decibel measurements that, if exceeded in a lab environment, will have a physical impact on one’s hearing.

As part of last year’s Hearing Awareness Week, however, Catherine McMahon, head of audiology at Macquarie University’s Australian Hearing Hub, announced “Moderate [noise] levels which may not be damaging to hearing can increase stress, decrease motivation and therefore reduce workplace productivity.”

What Is Moderate Noise?

In terms of lab safety, what constitutes moderate noise can be subjective, which makes it more difficult for employers to address. Moreover, the trend toward open, collaborative workplaces, including modern offices and many labs, means that conversations and other everyday sounds from adjacent workstations are more prevalent than ever—and increasingly being recognized as potential contributors to noise safety problems. But each situation is different.

“Noise is a subjective parameter; therefore we need to assess how an individual reacts to sound and determine its effects on distractibility, stress and productivity,” said Professor McMahon. “Speech from an adjacent cubicle can be considered annoying if it is distracting others from working, which is not simply a matter of the level of an individual’s voice.”

When Annoyance Becomes a Lab Safety Concern

We may think that annoyance is simply something we must accept when working with others. However, when researchers are exposed to annoying noise on a daily basis, stress symptoms can develop. As we’ve discussed before, such stress can lead to sleep loss, cardiovascular disease and a host of related symptoms.

Unfortunately, commonly used remedies will not work in a lab situation. In an office setting, earplugs or music are often recommended to block out annoying noise, but in a lab, those solutions just aren’t as practical. For example, you need to be able to hear certain sounds or colleagues’ warnings in the event a problem arises. If you block out all noise, you will block out the sounds you most need to hear in case of an emergency or accident.

Addressing Noise Safety at the Source

Addressing noise safety concerns is a primary reason for the development of our IonBench MS. With its specially designed enclosures, we have reduced vacuum pump noise by a guaranteed 15 dBA—a 75 percent reduction. This allows researchers to work collaboratively, right next to the bench, without needing to raise their voices in a way that would annoy colleagues at other workstations. In this way, our dedicated lab furniture becomes a key component of an effective lab safety protocol.

To learn more about IonBench and our commitment to a low-stress and low-annoyance work environment, contact us today.

Mass Spec Lab Safety: Electrical Hazards

Electricity represents both a necessity and a danger in every lab. In this second part of our “back to basics” mass spec safety series, we review more of the various types of lab safety issues one can encounter when operating mass spec technology.

In part one, we covered mechanical hazards. This time around, we will discuss the electrical hazards associated with mass spectrometry.

Internal Voltage Hazards

When functioning properly, some areas of mass spectrometers can expose operators to lethal voltage levels. High voltages can remain within a mass spec even when it is powered off, and capacitors can remain charged even though the instrument has been disconnected from all power sources.

As your MS literature undoubtedly says, do not use this instrument “in a manner not prescribed.” If your mass spec is not operating properly, do not take it apart to investigate it yourself. Call in either the professionals who manufactured your MS or a qualified repair technician.

Lab Safety Interlocks and Shields

Because of the danger of such high voltages, mass spectrometers have protective covers or shields to prevent lab techs from accessing the ion source probes. Do not power up or operate your MS unless those protective shields have been properly installed. Interlocks have also been integrated into your mass spec as a lab safety feature to prevent electrical shock. Do not override those interlocks.

When it’s time for routine maintenance, disconnect the ion source from the mass spec. Removing the ion-source housing will disable the high-voltage connection. Beware, however: As mentioned earlier, MS capacitors can remain charged even when your mass spec is disconnected from its power source.

Grounding Hazards

The mass spectrometer was developed long before grounded electrical outlets were required (and hopefully none of your mass specs are that old), but it would never be wise to operate your modern MS today without a correctly installed protective earth conductor.

Always have your electrical outlets checked by a qualified electrician before installing a mass spectrometer and make certain that the protective earth system maintains its integrity. (In fact, it’s an excellent idea to have all outlets in your lab checked at the time of installation, as you may need to rearrange your lab at some point in the future and plug your MS into a different outlet.) Operating an ungrounded mass spec effectively turns the entire instrument into a lab safety hazard.

Electrical Circuit Protection and Hazards

Your mass spec has been designed for operation with a specific electrical mains supply. If you operate the instrument with an improper mains or insufficient circuit protection, multiple lab safety issues will arise: You could damage the electrical wiring system. You could cause an electrical fire—possibly within the walls of your lab, where it would be extremely difficult to suppress. And you could damage your expensive mass spectrometer.

Before installing or operating any mass spectrometer, make certain that the branch circuit protection satisfies the requirements of your MS system. Also confirm that your mass spec voltage matches the mains supply coming into your lab.

Mass Spec Safety Starts with You

Electricity is a powerful resource—and with any power comes real danger. As we’ve said throughout this series, complacency is itself a lab safety hazard. Do not take electricity for granted. Periodically return to the basics and remind yourself of electricity’s potential hazards in a lab setting.

For help in grounding your mass spectrometer on the most stable platform possible, learn more about our IonBench MS, or contact us at 1-888-669-1233 with any questions you may have about mass spec safety or our dedicated lab furniture.

Back to Basics: Mechanical Mass Spec Safety Reminders

reminder notesRecently we got “back to basics” with reminders about the importance of common lab safety issues and the dangers of becoming complacent.

The same complacency can happen when working specifically with a mass spec. Here’s a reminder of safety issues that can arise in any lab, starting with mass spectrometer mechanical hazards.

Hot Hazards

Your mass spec gets hot when it works. In fact, the ion source probe can exceed a temperature of 700 degrees Celsius in some machines, due to gas flow and temperature settings. This means you must allow at least 10 minutes after your protocol is finished before removing the ion source and probe.

Heavy Hazards

Your mass spectrometer is not designed to be lifted and carried around, which is why our IonBench MS is designed with strong casters that can withstand the weight of your mass spec.

To avoid a lab accident, do not lift or transfer your mass spectrometer without the help of qualified service personnel. If your mass spec is not on a wheeled lab bench, check its weight in the safety materials provided with your instrument, and it bears repeating to be certain to obtain qualified help for moving it. Remember that not only do you risk injuring your back from lifting such heavy equipment, but you could also damage the instrument through rough handling.

Outflow Hazards

Materials that flow into your mass spectrometer also flow out. Your mass spec’s drain vessel will collect discharge from the ion source, and this effluent could contain acidic, caustic, or dangerous organic elements. Residual trace amounts of the solutions you analyzed could also be present, posing a lab safety issue.

In addition, when using your mass spec there are potential hazards associated with the exhaust. Exhaust gases must be safely vented through the source system to avoid any discharge of toxic materials.

Gas Hazards

Gases pose a lab safety hazard because they are stored in pressurized containers. Those containers have explosive potential, especially if you are careless about where they are set or stored.

Make certain flammable gases are never placed near an area where open flames are generated, nor stored near instruments or devices that generate heat, such as the coils of your freezer or the vents of your lab’s HVAC system.

Nitrogen Hazards

Nitrogen gas is of particular concern and worth a separate mention as it is commonly used in mass specs. Nitrogen is neither explosive nor combustible, meaning that it does not pose the same types of dangers mentioned above. However, nitrogen gas will displace oxygen if it is allowed to escape, raising the possibility of suffocation, so proper storage of nitrogen is critical. If you have a dewar or generator in a confined space, consider an oxygen sensor/alarm.

Trace Hazards

Finally, residue from any hazardous or biohazardous materials that you have analyzed in your mass spectrometer can remain in trace amounts on your instrument. Always carefully clean the interface, vacuum chamber, and ion source. Contaminants can also end up in your pump oil, and thus also the oil exhaust filter.

Enhancing Mass Spec Safety

All of the above mass spec safety hazards can be mitigated to some degree. Using dedicated lab furniture that has been specifically designed for your mass spectrometer is one way to significantly reduce the possibility of accidents in your lab.

But mechanical hazards are just one aspect of mass spec safety. Our next post will address the electrical safety hazards posed by mass specs.

For more ideas on how you can address lab safety concerns, contact us today.

Avoid Complacency with Regular Lab Safety Reminders

don't forget Complacency is an enemy of lab safety. Once you’ve been working in a particular lab for a while, it’s easy to take things for granted—you know the workflow, you develop your routines, and eventually everything you’re doing seems automatic.

While this is a natural human tendency, and not cause for guilt or blame, it also opens the door to lab accidents. Which is why periodic lab safety reminders—even getting back to the very basics—are important to ensure that no one forgets that a lab can be a dangerous place.

Preventing the 4 Most Common Types of Lab Accidents

There are four types of common lab accidents, which can happen in any type of lab environment:

Eye Injuries – Do you sometimes get lazy and not bother to don your safety glasses, perhaps when “just checking up” on something’s progress? Lab safety should always be a primary consideration, regardless of how much time you will spend in the lab.

Eye accidents are the most common of serious injuries; don’t become a statistic. Put on those safety glasses, even if you’re wearing regular glasses, as agents can find lots of real estate between frame and face. Remember that contact lenses never protect your eyes, and can even absorb airborne chemicals, worsening eye injuries.

Glassware Cuts – Many lab professionals can vividly recall doing something foolish in their “younger days,” like forcing glass tubing through a stopper and ending up with broken glass all over their hands. Foolishness may decrease with age, but it increases again with complacency.

Wearing gloves is wise, but it can be a catch-22, as gloves may inhibit the fine dexterity required with certain tasks. Whenever you can, however, do wear gloves.

Also, always keep your mind on the processes taking place in your hands, and don’t try to force anything—ever. If it doesn’t fit, find another solution.

 Chemical Irritation – Another reason to keep those gloves handy is to prevent chemical irritation or burns from accidental exposure. Note that your hands aren’t the only body parts at risk. Dangerous chemicals can also be accidentally inhaled, dropped on exposed arms or legs, or even ingested if you aren’t careful about thoroughly cleaning up after yourself.

Your earliest training in kindergarten is as useful now as ever: “Wash those hands!”

 Heat Burns – Burns are the final type of common injury to take place in a lab environment, and they occur particularly frequently due to lack of careful attention. Forget to tie back long hair, forget glass gets hot, or forget to keep your hands and other body parts away from a Bunsen burner or hot plate and burns are likely to occur. In all of those situations, the operative word is “forget.”

Consciously making the effort to pay attention in the lab is the best preventive measure you can take to enhance lab safety.

Two Additional Lab Safety Reminders

In addition to being aware of the common lab accidents listed above, there are other preventive lab safety measures you should regularly take:

  • Familiarize yourself with every material safety data sheet (MSDS), to remind yourself of potential dangers.
  • Check all lab safety equipment (fire blanket, extinguishers, eyewash, shower) to (1) remind yourself where to go in case of emergency, and (2) make certain that everything is in place and prepared to function properly.

We care about lab safety and have made it a central focus in the development of our IonBenches. To that end, we’ve designed our dedicated lab furniture to limit noise that can impact attention and hamper communication, while also ensuring that each bench and desk is easy to move and rearrange.

If you have other lab safety suggestions, we’re happy to listen and share them. Contact us today to discuss how our IonBench can contribute to a safer environment in your lab.

 

2018 Lab Safety Goal: Recognize Lab Noise as Serious Risk

RiskWe recently shared a disturbing report about the major gap between organizational culture and lab safety realities. We’ve all seen instances where company culture doesn’t exactly promote an environment where safety protocols can realistically be followed.

Petrotechnics surveyed over 200 senior leaders in the hydrocarbon industry and found that they held grave concerns over the lack of safety follow-through in their organizations. While company literature said all the right things about making safety a priority, the organizational procedures and practices did not hold up their end of the bargain when it came to following through on those priorities.

Most worrisome was the finding that the corporate culture in the majority of these organizations was actually resistant to implementation of process safety and risk management (PSM) procedures. This resistance is not necessarily rooted in carelessness or even maliciousness—rather, it is rooted in the natural tendency for corporations to drive productivity.

Let’s take this insight one step further and focus on a key concern of ours: lab noise reduction.

The Case for Lab Noise Reduction

A noisy lab is not just a threat to the ears of those who work there—though that is well-proven and certainly a necessary priority—it also linked with a range of diverse health issues. These include an increase in stress (with all its symptoms, including lack of sleep, short-temperedness, and an inability to concentrate, all of which can impact the interpretation of results in a critical lab procedure), coronary disease, hypertension and even our brain’s ability to process information correctly (again potentially leading to faulty test reporting).

Lab noise can interfere with critical communications, making it a safety hazard in a much different way. A noisy work environment makes verbal communications very difficult. And when lab personnel are dealing with potentially hazardous materials, there is very little room for error. What if a lab tech was to mishear instructions for handling a certain compound because the noise level in the lab was too high? This mishap could result in cross contamination, chemical burns, or even fires or explosions.

Integrating Lab Noise Reduction into Your Organizational Culture

We believe that lab noise reduction is a key ingredient in the lab safety recipe. Too many people, at all levels of an organization, can take their hearing and health for granted, choosing instead to focus on preventing the more spectacular lab accidents that make the news.

Noise doesn’t seem like an immediate threat or a potential major hazard—its impact is, however, insidious and lasting.

It’s why we’ve integrated lab noise reduction into our IonBench MS, which isolates up to three vacuum pumps in specially designed chambers of our custom designed lab furniture. With a lab noise reduction of over 75%, this dedicated lab furniture will minimize lab safety issues and facilitate efficient and accurate results by allowing everyone in the lab to hear each other, communicate clearly, and focus on research rather than PSM.

The more aware lab managers are to seemingly nonthreatening safety issues, the better the overall productivity of a lab and well-being of everyone there. We encourage you, and your team to embrace an integrated organizational culture that pays heed to even seemingly benign risks like lab noise. A well-thought-out lab noise reduction strategy can be a key element in effective lab safety culture. To learn more about how we can help, contact us today.