Tag Archives: Lab Design

2018 Lab Design of the Year Winner Includes Many Innovations

The annual international Laboratory of the Year Awards recognize “excellence in research laboratory design, planning and construction.” In this post, we salute the facility that was awarded 2018 Laboratory of the Year and discuss how some elements of its design philosophy integrate seamlessly with our mission to provide the best in dedicated lab furniture that fits into any lab design.

And the Winner Is: CJ Blossom Park

The 2018 award was given to South Korea’s CJ Blossom Park. The architects, CannonDesign, created a three-tower flower-petal shape that represents and houses the three formerly separate and still distinct science divisions within CJ Corporation. This R&D headquarters allows for cross-operational collaboration, centralized administration, and the inclusion of a number of stress-lowering features for employees that are designed to prevent burnout.

A Lab Design Philosophy of Science without Stress

Key to many elements within this lab design is a recognition that stress is a constant factor in modern life. One of CJ Corporation’s goals is to attract and retain the next generation of young scientists. Created in collaboration with CannonDesign, the resulting lab design incorporates not just innovative laboratories and workspaces but almost 50 different types of amenities that take up 10% of the total square footage of the building complex. These facilities include a library, fitness rooms and a spa, sleeping pods, coffee shops, and a café.

The facilities include a variety of elements designed to bring nature into the building. There is an indoor “living forest” that can be viewed from inside the laboratories and a multistory, calming water garden on the bottom floors. The landscaped grounds sit adjacent to a park that provides glimpses of trees and a grassy hillside from many portions of the facility.

Incorporating the Best Dedicated Lab Furniture, Features, and Flexibility

All of this is nice, but would not be of much value if the working lab features weren’t also well-designed. The facility uses a universal lab bench design and size, which we have previously noted is an efficient and flexible solution to frequently changing processes and procedures. Each piece of its dedicated lab furniture is serviced from an overhead boom that provides power, data, and lab gasses.

The three petals/towers are designed to maximize available natural light for the lab segments as a whole. CannonDesign used advanced barometric monitoring to track the sun’s movement around the facility, then created a lab design that maximizes use of natural daylight. It saved energy and cost by separating ambient lighting from more focused, powerful (and expensive) task lighting, which can be moved in conjunction with the dedicated lab furniture when layouts need to be reconfigured.

Lab design innovations can provide valuable efficiencies to any modern lab. This is why we take note of awards such as Laboratory of the Year. We applaud the winning lab’s innovations and look forward to supporting other labs by sharing ideas on how to utilize our dedicated lab furniture in their lab design plans. For more information, contact Tim Hawkins today via email or at 1-888-669-1233.

What an Airline Can Teach You about Lab Design and Dedicated Lab Furniture

Sometimes a lesson learned in one industry can easily be applied to another. The recent passing of Southwest Airlines founder Herb Kelleher brought much attention to his progressive thinking. We saw an older article about the airline that sparked some inspiring thought on our part, so we thought we’d share the idea.

It turns out that Southwest Airlines has a wise business philosophy that applies to lab design and the purchasing of dedicated lab furniture.

What Makes Southwest Airlines Special

So, what caught our attention in this article? We noticed that Southwest Airlines’ focus on a single type of airplane makes good business sense in a variety of ways.

By exclusively using Boeing 737s, Southwest only needs to train mechanics on inspecting and repairing, and pilots on flying, a single type of plane. They only need to order and keep a single set of spare parts on hand. They can swap out airplanes at any time, for any reason, without worrying that their crew in a certain city can’t handle the plane if something needs attention before it returns to home base.

How strong is their commitment to this business model? When Southwest purchased AirTran, they leased all AirTran’s other types and models of planes to other airlines, rather than expanding their own fleet. They then used those funds to keep their current business model thriving.

Why This Business Model Works

Think about it for a moment: if you only need to train users on a single type of machine, training takes less time and money. If one mechanic or pilot is out sick, another can easily step in, because they all have the same expertise. Mechanics are also more likely to notice problems because they’re used to seeing each part of each plane looking the same; if something is out of line, they’ll notice right away.

Southwest Airlines also saves big on that inventory of spare parts. Not only do they intentionally limit the types of parts they need to have on hand, they can also order in bulk and receive significant discounts as a result.

How Does This Apply to Lab Design and Dedicated Lab Furniture?

If you’re designing a new lab or renovating an existing facility, it’s best if everything can work well together too. If you purchase dedicated lab furniture from a number of manufacturers, they might not interface as cleanly. Different lab benches might have different heights or widths, hoses might not connect through the same part of the furniture, or the power supply might be located on different sides.

Consistency with design and operation also matters if you need a flexible lab design with lots of moving parts. With a single brand of dedicated lab furniture (and especially if it features industrial-strength caster wheels like IonBench), you can easily move people and processes around your lab without needing to instruct staff on how to use the different benches. Plus, if you buy an attractive line of benches (again, like IonBench), they just all look great in your lab.

Bulk purchasing can also work with dedicated lab furniture. If you’re outfitting a new lab design from scratch, ordering all your benches from one dedicated specialist can save you money in volume discounts, delivery, and time you would otherwise have spent negotiating with a variety of manufacturers.

So are you working up a new lab design? Is it time to upgrade your fleet of dedicated lab furniture? Reach out to Tim Hawkins today (at 1-888-669-1233 or via email) and he can help you see why choosing a single type of dedicated lab furniture is a sound investment.

More Lab Design Tips for a Functional Workspace

Every lab has its own unique set of specs and of challenges, but there are some principles at play that everyone can benefit from understanding. Here are five more tips to create functional lab workspaces.

1.    Synchronize Your Plumbing, Mechanical, and Electrical

No lab design is complete without making all the right connections. We mentioned last time the importance of ensuring proper ventilation. The same is true of the other building-wide systems that will interact with your lab. Coordinate with plumbing to make certain pipes don’t interfere with the placement of your dedicated lab furniture.

Place electrical outlets where needed, both for current configurations and possible future reorganizations of your equipment. Modern architectural programs even include clash-detection programs; use them to make certain you are designing the best possible layout for wired and connected equipment.

2.    Keep Your Lab Cool

All working machines produce heat, so another consideration in the lab design phase is where heat will be generated and whether there is sufficient cooling appropriately placed. If not, you run the risk of shortening the life of your instruments — or even outright damaging them — as well as making your lab an uncomfortable place to work.

3.    Plan Safe Storage into Your Lab Design

Avoid the dangerous possibility of lab techs using fume hoods as storage spots (we’ve all seen it!). Make certain you order sufficient dedicated lab furniture of the appropriate types for secure storage of hazardous chemicals and gases. Plan placement of your storage units to avoid the possibility of cross-contamination and for efficient workflow.

4.    Invest in Flexible Dedicated Lab Furniture

It can be frustrating to need to rearrange your lab — but it’s inevitable. Processes and priorities change, instruments are upgraded, and new protocols are put in place. Make this easier on yourself by investing in movable dedicated lab furniture whenever possible. Our IonBenches come with superior strength caster wheels, making moving easier even with heavy equipment. Purchasing a height-adjustable lab bench allows you to easily connect your HPLC with a new and differently configured mass spec.

5.    Check all Clearances

No, we’re not talking about security clearances here, though that might also need to be part of some lab design specs. Here we’re talking about the space you need to maneuver your dedicated lab furniture around your facility. Is there enough clearance to get a certain lab bench through a doorway, down a hallway, or around a corner? Review every possible pathway for your instruments and ancillary machinery, from an entry point to your building, all the way to each lab that might use that piece of equipment. This way, you will ensure that any instrument can be moved or removed as needed.

If you have questions or want more tips on how to set up the perfect lab with dedicated lab benches, contact Tim Hawkins now at 1-888-669-1233 or by email.

Lab Design Tips for a Functional Workspace: Part 1

We all know that a poorly designed engine will not perform efficiently. The same is true with lab design. Awkward layouts, incompatible pieces of dedicated lab furniture, and tight or wasted space can all affect the efficiency of your processes. Here are five lab design tips to create functional lab workspaces.

1.    Get Everyone on Board

No lab is going to function at its best if all stakeholders are not involved in its design. Begin with an all-hands-on-deck kickoff meeting, but don’t let it end there. Keep people at all levels of the organization involved throughout the lab design process. Encourage additional input. In fact, invite staff to think about processes as they work and talk with maintenance concerning what does and doesn’t work smoothly after lab techs have left for the day. Brainstorming new solutions to existing problems can ensure a more efficient work environment for the long haul.

2.    Start Your Lab Design with a Focus on Control Areas

One key component of a successful lab design is appropriate separation of hazardous and combustible materials. List all current chemicals used, but also brainstorm where research and trajectories are taking your lab processes, so that you can control chemical interactions in the future as well as with current projects. Include careful consideration of code and safety requirements as well. Be certain to design storage areas to meet your needs and be sure to purchase sufficient dedicated lab furniture for the safe storage of all types of hazardous chemicals.

3.    Size Your Space to Meet Present and Future Needs

If you’ve ever worked in an older lab, you know how frustrating it can be when the footprint of your equipment has grown, necessitating larger and more complex lab furniture. Often, the space becomes crowded and staff find it difficult to navigate safely through cramped work areas. When creating a new lab design, allow plenty of space for not just any lab furniture, but the latest, safest dedicated lab benches that can account for the maneuvering on heavy-duty caster wheels (such as our IonBenches) for an HPLC or other peripheral machines that are used episodically or need to be repositioned throughout the lab.

4.    Organize Your Space to Ensure Proper Ventilation

Modern HVAC systems can pull quite a bit of air through a space. This can be a boon for proper ventilation—or a nightmare if improperly installed. Make certain that lab pressurization will meet safety standards. Ensure that the location of fume hoods and live flames will not intersect with HVAC systems in such a way as to cause fumes to escape containment, and potentially spread throughout your building or the HVAC system, blowing out or suddenly expanding a live flame, which would result in a dangerous lab accident.

5.    Get a Complete and Comprehensive Equipment List

Another reason for involving all stakeholders in your lab design (see tip #1 above) is the need to get a comprehensive equipment list. Once you know all the equipment that must be place in your lab design, you can design a complete layout and work with a dedicated lab furniture vendor like us to install lab benches and ancillary furniture that will support each workstation in your new lab design.

This is why we encourage you to contact Tim Hawkins now via email or at 1-888-669-1233. He can discuss the importance of consistency provided by installing dedicated lab furniture from a single vendor that will integrate seamlessly to support lab processes.

Also, stay tuned for our next post, which will share five more tips for designing a functional lab workspace.

Why Modular Lab Design Concepts Make Sense for Any Lab

Trends come and go—and it can be beneficial to understand the reasons behind the rise and fall of new ideas.

One of the hottest new developments is modularity. This trend began with government requests for modular lab units that could be easily packed up and shipped to new locations as needs changed.

While you might not need to pack up your lab for delivery to the newest natural disaster or environmental testing site, many of the principles behind this trend can be useful for our own lab design, especially for the purposes of renovation or expansion.

Modular Lab Design: Adapting to Changing Demands

One reason to embrace the concepts behind modular lab design is that they facilitate adaptability. Equipment, task, and mission changes occur frequently, and a modular approach to lab design allows managers to more easily and efficiently adapt to those changing demands.

Also, with a modular approach, renovations can more easily replace outdated facilities and equipment. Localizing vacuum systems, installing ductless fume hoods, and upgrading to movable dedicated lab furniture all contribute to a lab design that’s easier to modify as needs change.

Dedicated Lab Furniture Designed for Safety

With the right dedicated lab furniture, your modular approach to lab design provides additional benefits. Lab safety, for instance, is always a key consideration. Every module must connect with the next in a pattern that allows for free and easy movement between portions of the lab—and out the doors in the case of an accident.

Our IonBenches come on caster wheels so that they can be easily moved around the lab, even with heavy, expensive mass spectrometry equipment installed on top. Well-placed dedicated lab furniture also ensures that technicians don’t bump into each other at critical moments due to awkwardly positioned or inferior furniture.

The Flexibility of Modular Design

Beyond addressing lab safety concerns, lab furniture should also be specifically designed to meet the dynamic, changing needs of busy labs. In the same way that modular configurations accommodate the particular needs of specific researchers or projects, our IonBenches can be quickly moved to address new parameters or requirements. Plus, our custom additions provide additional storage drawers and specialized hardware for mounting computers and other instruments.

Choose the Right Partner for Your Project

Whether you are creating a modular lab design from scratch or looking to refresh an aging lab to meet present-day demands, finding the right information can be a challenge. Often, a simple online comparison won’t allow you to sufficiently determine the best fit between your particular lab design needs and the lab furniture available.

That’s why you should contact our expert, Tim Hawkins. He specializes in understanding the needs of modern labs, including the trend toward modular lab designs, and can help you with dedicated lab furniture that will meet your needs now and, in the years—and lab design changes—ahead. Contact Tim at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233 today to discuss your specific requirements.

Mass Spec Lab Design Trends: Supporting a Collaborative Workplace

07Proper lab design can be critical for successful research. Over the years, many mass spec lab design trends have come and gone.

It’s why we think it’s important to stay up on the latest trends unfolding in the field—and it also gives us the opportunity to mention how well our dedicated lab furniture can fit into labs designed using the latest ideas.

Collaboration Is Key

These days, there’s a definite move toward more collaboration. Historically, facilities tended toward a siloed type of mass spec lab design. Today, however, “open labs” are increasingly the trend.

They allow for team-based work, problem-solving, and a more social approach to lab culture. One reason for this trend is that many millennials have been taught to approach problem-solving as a team, bouncing ideas off each other. Open labs help support this methodology.

Retaining Some Closed Mass Spec Lab Design Options

While the open lab is helpful in many cases, there are other situations when closed labs are more practical and efficient. For example, when large amounts of equipment dominate, such as in many mass spec labs, it can be more cost efficient to opt for a traditional “closed” lab design, surrounded by open spaces that allow for shared use of the equipment.

Some procedures, such as glass washing, tissue culturing, and dark room work, are also better suited to closed labs. Quiet, enclosed spaces tend to be more efficient for data analysis and report writing as well.

Addressing Energy Demand

Another trend being addressed by the latest types of lab designs are “green” or environmental concerns. Research labs typically use a good deal of resources, consuming as much as five times more energy and water than say a teaching space.

As a result, implementing environmentally sustainable designs and gaining LEED certification can be especially beneficial, potentially saving money in utility and operations costs.

Flexibility Remains Important

For years, we’ve been talking about the importance of flexibility in lab design. In fact, adaptability seems to be an ever-more-valuable aspect of mass spec lab design. Whether it’s due to the growth of interdisciplinary sciences or a desired decrease in long-term renovation costs (and lab downtime), designing a mass spec lab space that can be easily reconfigured is a key component for success.

One innovation that serves this type of flexibility is the overhead service carrier. By supplying everything from air and gas to localized exhaust and power, overhead carriers allow for lab benches to be reconfigured easily while still connecting to critical components. Power trunks can also be installed in each service carrier, allowing a mass spectrometer to be placed anywhere within a particular lab space.

Lab benches such as our IonBench MS are key players in this trend toward flexibility. When mass spectrometers are placed in open lab environments, it’s critical to keep them quiet. Our roughing pump enclosures reduce noise by 75 percent, enabling collaborative conversations to more easily take place. In addition, our solidly built, lockable casters make moving massive equipment a much easier and safer prospect.

To learn more about how our IonBenches can support integration of the latest modern lab design trends, contact us today.

 

Ventilation Safety Recommendations for Your Lab Design

FanGood laboratory design is not just about efficient workstation layouts, component placements, and emergency exits. Dedicated lab furniture, storage units, and other components must be carefully and mindfully placed to avoid tripping hazards and other lab safety issues.

But that’s not all. Ventilation is a key lab safety factor that must be considered also in any lab design. Every lab must include the ability to safely remove contaminated air and circulate sufficiently cooled or heated air to prevent unwanted spontaneous reactions or overheated equipment.

Here are some considerations for incorporating safety cabinets, fume hoods, and canopy hoods into your new lab design or renovation project.

Biological Safety Cabinets

A biological containment system is only effective if airflow around the cabinet remains within spec during use. Thus, every biological safety cabinet must be installed and tested appropriately to ascertain sufficient airflow. OSHA states that biological safety cabinets must be certified each year—but also every time they are moved.

This means that if your renovated lab design entails rearranging equipment, you will need to be certain there is sufficient airflow in the new location, and also have the cabinet re-tested after the new setup is complete.

Unlike mass spectrometers, which can easily be moved around the lab on dedicated lab furniture with casters, your biological safety cabinet needs to remain where it is installed. Otherwise, it will need to be recertified every time a move occurs.

Chemical Fume Hoods

Fume hoods provide the primary control for protecting lab techs who work with flammable or toxic chemicals. This means that they hold a primary place in any lab safety process. As with biological safety cabinets, OSHA requires that chemical fume hoods provide sufficient airflow throughout any lab procedure.

When creating any new lab design, care must be taken to ensure that nothing will block the airflow through the baffles or baffle exhaust slots. Sufficient safe storage for all chemicals must also be located nearby, so that technicians are not tempted to store chemicals within the fume hood, which is also against OSHA regulations. Including a backup power generator for each fume hood is also recommended to prevent accidental loss of airflow during any power failure.

Canopy Hoods

It is important for any lab designer to remember the difference between fume hoods and canopy hoods. Canopy hoods are only intended to vent heat in general, or for specific processes, such as autoclaves.

While industrial-level ventilation may not be necessary, canopy hoods must still vent air outside the lab workspace, and preferably outside the building completely. Canopy hoods are also not meant to be used for personal workstations, so an adequate lab design must allow for this.

Lab Safety Knowhow for You

To learn more about the ventilation and electrical needs of today’s working labs, or to find out how dedicated lab furniture—including our customizable lab benches for mass spectrometry—can increase the safety and efficiency of your lab, reach out to talk with us today.

 

Incorporating Storage Safety Recommendations into Your Lab Design

StorageWhile every lab is different, labs in general have a number of common elements that factor into safety. Every laboratory design must incorporate assessments of the procedures expected to take place, the lab safety of the researchers and technicians conducting those procedures, and the types and volumes of hazardous materials they will be using.

But you don’t just need to consider lab technicians’ safety as they’re working with hazardous materials—you also need to plan in the lab design stage for how they’ll safely store those materials when they’re not working with them.

Secure Shelving Requirements

Some storage requirements are fairly straightforward. When storing any chemicals or other hazardous materials on open shelving, it’s important to purchase dedicated lab furniture shelving that includes edge guards.

These edge guards should measure between 1/2 and 3/4 of an inch in height and should run around all four sides of the shelf. Whether the shelf units are out in the open for easy access or tucked away in a well-ventilated storage closet, the edge guards should prevent any containers from spilling onto other hazardous materials or nearby equipment or personnel.

Corralling Corrosive and Flammable Materials with Dedicated Lab Furniture

When it comes to hazardous liquids, specialized storage cabinets are required, and you must integrate space for them into your lab design. The National Fire Protection Association and Underwriters Laboratories have approved certain types of dedicated lab furniture for both flammable and corrosive liquids. Specially designed storage cabinets must be resistant to fire and corrosion, and acids must be stored separately from bases.

Cylinders holding compressed gas must be securely attached to a stable structure, using non-combustible metal chains or similar materials. You should avoid anything that could burn in a fire, such as cloth or leather straps. This is why it’s critical to understand exactly what types of procedures will take place in research labs and incorporate sufficient cabinets and supportive storage spaces and anchors into each new lab design.

Implementing Signage in Your Lab Design

Along with using appropriate dedicated lab furniture for safe storage, each shelf unit or cabinet will need to be labeled with the correct signage. All cabinets that will hold flammable liquids must have a sign saying FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS. Cabinets or shelving that will hold acids must have an ACIDS sign. Cabinets containing alkaline liquids must be labeled BASES or ALKALIS. Finally, all strong oxidizers must be identified with a sign saying OXIDIZERS.

There is more to these signage requirements than a simple organizational strategy. Separating hazardous materials lessens the likelihood of accidental, and potentially dangerous, chemical reactions. The signs also provide tired lab assistants with an additional visual reminder not to store hazardous materials in the wrong place.

Increase the Safety of Your Lab

Naturally, we are strong advocates for using the right types of dedicated lab furniture in every laboratory design. Whether you’re planning space for hazardous materials cabinets or mobile mass spectrometry lab benches, using specially designed and dedicated lab furniture will always contribute to increased lab safety. To learn more about the advantages of our space-saving, movable mass spectrometry or HPLC benches, contact us today.

 

 

Lab Design Tips that will Save You Energy and Money

HVACWhether you’re retrofitting an existing lab or constructing a new laboratory building, there are a number of elements which must be considered in every laboratory design project. One of these is how much energy the lab will consume, and what can be done to keep costs down without jeopardizing the work being done. Here are some energy-saving lab design tips that can impact the bottom line while allowing any lab to perform perfectly.

Getting a Lab Design Handle on HVAC

By far the most expensive energy guzzler in most labs is the HVAC system. In any lab design, the heating/ventilation/air conditioning system must provide comfortable, clean air to every room in the building at all times. This can mean completely changing out all the air in the entire facility as much as twelve times per hour—as opposed to the standard four times per hour of a more typical office building.

Naturally, doing this takes a lot of energy, but there are ways to decrease the cost. Most lab HVAC systems can be programmed for different volumes at different times, so if your lab doesn’t operate on a 24/7 schedule, you can decrease the air cycling rates when the building is unoccupied. More sophisticated HVAC systems can also perform real-time air quality testing, which allows the system’s computer to increase rates when air contaminants are present and decrease them when the air is testing clean.

Preventing all that Conditioned Air from Escaping

Another energy culprit in many labs is the fume hood. Because this piece of dedicated lab equipment vents air to the outdoors, it also whisks away that carefully cleaned and cooled (or heated) air from the HVAC system. Fume hoods themselves also take energy to operate—as much as three residential home energy systems, in fact. You can therefore save energy on both your HVAC system and your fume hood by training lab workers to always close the sash when the fume hood is not in use.

Factoring in the Human Element

As noted above, tackling energy savings is often related to addressing the attitudes and practices of lab technicians. For example, you can save up to thirty percent on the energy bill for your ultra-low temperature freezer by upping the thermostat by just ten degrees, but you may first have to address your researchers’ fears of sample damage. Teaching techs to use task lighting, and to turn out the lights at the end of the day, may seem insignificant, but it can reap major rewards when the energy bill arrives each month.

It’s also true that you often have to invest in your energy savings up-front, during the laboratory design process. When considering the cost of a lab design or retrofit, you may need to advocate for a more expensive, air-monitoring HVAC system in order to save energy costs in the long run. You should also invest in dedicated lab furniture that fully supports your lab equipment and allows it to run most efficiently. Our MS lab benches filter out vacuum pump noise, making for a quieter and safer lab, take up thirty percent less space and can even help with your HVAC costs in your new lab design. To learn more about integrating our dedicated lab furniture into your new laboratory design, contact us for a free quote today.

 

 

Lab Design with Soundproofing in Mind

Sometimes lab QuietBench_Shh1design and lab safety go hand in hand. This is especially true with noise. While dedicated lab furniture contributes to noise reduction, as we talk about often, so can lab design when it comes to soundproofing.

After all, it can be just as difficult to focus on your experiments when you’re able to hear instrument noises and voices from an adjoining lab coming through the walls, as it is if the sound is emanating from an unenclosed vacuum pump beneath the mass spectrometer you are using. As we often point out, it is critical to create a quiet lab environment for safety and the sake of the work being conducted.

Understanding Wall Design and Soundproofing

Many people think that insulation is the only variable that matters when it comes to soundproofing a wall. This is not the case, however. To understand why, we need to remember two basic physics lessons.

The first is that sound travels more easily through connected materials (aka “structural paths”) than it does through empty space. This matters because conventional or “standard” walls are constructed by nailing drywall to either side of a single row of studs. As a result, sound travels from the drywall on one side, through the stud, and out through the drywall on the other side—thus easily transmitting sound through the wall, from one room to another.

The second physics lesson tells us that the empty spaces between sections of drywall and the spaces between studs also transmit sound—although not as much as a structural path. This is why many lab designs incorporate insulation into those empty spaces between the walls. But insulation is usually insufficient because it’s just filling in the holes between the structural paths, which remain in place.

Laboratory Design with Soundproofing in Mind

A common solution in the past has been to add more insulation, creating thicker walls but not solving the problem because the structural paths remain, transmitting sound between rooms.

One of the newer solutions to come along in lab design is the idea of a staggered-stud or decoupled wall. In this case, two sets of studs are offset, and drywall is only nailed to one side of each stud. This allows for a continuous band of insulation to be woven between the studs within the wall. Since there is no structural path all the way through the wall, this approach provides a demonstrable positive effect in reducing noise transmission between different labs.

Not All Sound Travels the Same

Unfortunately, not all frequencies of sound are equally baffled by these methods. Insulation, for example, has a more positive effect reducing middle- and high-frequency sounds, but less of an effect on low-frequency sounds. As a result, additional barriers to sound should be incorporated into your laboratory design—like our MS Bench.

With its integrated vacuum pump enclosure, this dedicated lab furniture provides a 75 percent reduction in noise, with a guaranteed sound suppression of 15 dBA. By integrating our benches for mass spectrometers into your new lab design, you will create an additional sound barrier. Coupled with the insulation of modern staggered-stud walls, our dedicated lab furniture ensures that your new lab is as quiet as possible, with no sound carryover from mass spectrometry research taking place in adjacent rooms.

New lab design should always incorporate the results of proven research, whether it involves structural advancements, instrumental improvements, software or even furnishings. Dedicated lab furniture is worth the investment in a quieter lab; request a quote today to learn more.