Tag Archives: Dedicated Lab Furniture

Lab Safety Issues Aren’t Always Obvious or Catastrophic

We frequently talk about safety in the lab on our blog and periodically share news about accidents that bring attention to the issue of lab safety. We do this to remind busy researchers that some safety issues can be addressed by investing in high-quality dedicated lab furniture. Other safety issues are sometimes not as simple.

Not All Accidents are Obvious

And not all accidents are catastrophic. Some of the most insidious lab accidents, in fact, occur over time. As we have pointed out in the past, even moderate levels of noise in the lab can have hidden, adverse effects on the health and well-being of staff. Long-term noise exposure wears down a body’s system in multiple ways, causing stress and a multitude of silent secondary illnesses like cardiovascular disease and sleep loss.

A Recent Insidious Lab Accident

Noise is not the only insidious cause of lab incidents. As we learned recently, a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University in New York experienced a lab safety accident that could have resulted in the loss of her sight. She was inspecting agarose gels under UV light, not wearing goggles, and did not know that a simple plastic cover on the UV light screen needed to be closed to protect both her eyes and her skin.

Over the course of just a few months, she suffered significant damage to her eyes. A trip to the hospital and many visits with a specialist followed. Two incorrect diagnoses slowed the process of addressing this lab safety issue. While the good news is that this student suffered no long-term permanent sight damage, the accident clearly illustrates the dangers of hidden lab safety issues.

Improving Lab Safety with Guidelines, Notices, and Meetings

Fortunately, Columbia University took a series of concrete steps to address the causes of this lab accident. First, they updated their existing lab safety guidelines to include safety information and precautions related to ultraviolet equipment. At each UV workstation, they placed goggles in a prominent location and added warning signs about UV dangers.

They also focused on conversation and collaboration. They held a series of meetings with staff from the university’s office of environmental health and safety. Those meetings focused on both the specific concerns of working in that particular lab and on the identification of general hazards. Lab workers also met together and discussed the accident. Then they went further. Each person shared which lab safety hazards they focused on, recognizing that no one person usually considers everything. By doing this, every staff member heard about the variety of hazards within the lab.

Including Dedicated Lab Furniture in the Lab Safety Conversation

Hopefully some member of that university lab team mentioned noise as a lab safety issue. Like UV light, noise is often taken for granted in a lab because its dangers aren’t obvious. This is why we designed our MS dedicated lab furniture with two vacuum pump enclosures that eliminate the noise from those pumps by 75%. To learn more about how dedicated lab furniture can prevent insidious lab accidents, contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233.

What to Do Before Your Lab Furniture Arrives

Are your mass spectrometry needs increasing? If you’re having conversations about ordering a new mass spec, make sure to order your new lab bench at the same time. Standard delivery of our dedicated lab furniture takes 2–3 weeks. This way, you can receive the lab bench in plenty of time to have it set up and waiting for your mass spec when it arrives. (If you’ve recently ordered a new mass spectrometer, call us for details on rush delivery.)

Just don’t forget, you need to prepare for the arrival of that mass spec lab furniture as well. Here are our tips for preparing the space for your new IonBench dedicated lab furniture.

Tip #1: Check for a Good Fit

Naturally you’re going to measure the space where you want your new equipment and lab bench to be installed. But don’t forget the prep work involved in getting your new bench to that installation point. As we’ve talked about in a prior post, you need to check the dimensions of every step of the journey from loading dock to installation point.

One question we frequently get is whether our IonBenches come pre-assembled. The answer is yes. As we discuss in the delivery section of our FAQs page, our IonBenches are delivered fully assembled and ready to use. While some additional items, like monitor arms, are installed on-site, the benches themselves are delivered in one piece, so you will need plenty of room to get it through doorways and down hallways.

Tip #2: Prepare for Uncrating Your Dedicated Lab Furniture

Another consideration is the uncrating of your new lab bench. We are responsible only for the delivery of your new lab furniture, but we keep a list of reliable third-party vendors that can uncrate your bench, dispose of the packing materials, and transfer the IonBench into your lab location. If you need those services, just let us know and we’ll recommend a team to help you.

Tip #3: Ask about Insurance

It’s a good idea that anyone who touches any part of your mass spectrometry system be fully bonded and insured. Many labs require it. This is especially important if space requirements demand that your new dedicated lab furniture be delivered uncrated. In large cities like Boston and New York, where space is at a premium and loading docks are usually compressed, goods often must be delivered completely uncrated.

Because of this, we suggest that you make certain every individual or team that’s responsible for any portion of the delivery and installation process be both bonded and insured. We assure you that we are fully bonded and insured for our part in the manufacturing and delivery process.

Do you have other questions about the delivery and installation of dedicated lab furniture? Tim Hawkins can answer them. Contact him at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233 to discuss the particular needs of your organization.

Four More Reasons You Need Mobile Lab Furniture

In our last post, we extolled the virtues of mobile lab furniture and discussed why it’s beneficial for safe and smooth functionality in your lab. In case you weren’t convinced by the first set of rationale, here are four additional reasons why standard, stationary lab furniture is not as good as an IonBench for modern labs.

Reason 5: Expand Laboratory Capacity

Expansion can be a tricky issue and can disrupt the organization in your lab. Sometimes additional work is temporary, or you’re fulfilling a short-term contract with funding that might not be renewed. You can’t afford to permanently expand your lab, but you need additional processing capacity—and you need it stat. This is where mobile lab furniture shines.

Perhaps there is not enough space around your existing, permanent lab fixtures to install another instrument. Maybe additional permanent dedicated lab furniture is not within budgetary parameters. Mobile lab furniture can accommodate expansion, then be tucked into a safe, out-of-the-way location until it is needed again, the next time your lab needs to flex its capacity.

Reason 6: Take Renovations in Stride

Even if expansion or renovation is possible, that raises another set of significant problems and issues. If your lab is undergoing renovation, how will you keep up with current demand? The answer is with mobile lab furniture, which can be used to easily move entire systems to temporary quarters, where current processes can continue uninterrupted during the renovation period. They can also be easily returned to the renovated space and rearranged with ease as you determine the best configurations for utilizing your upgraded lab environment.

Reason 7: Easily Align with Utilities

Any renovation or new lab project will give you the opportunity to place utilities exactly where you want and need them, but changing instruments will inevitably bring challenges. Standard dedicated lab furniture that doesn’t move easily can keep the new instrument apart from those utilities. Fortunately, mobile lab furniture makes it easy to move any instrument to meet the utilities. This means no need for the additional expense of rerouting gas lines or installing additional outlets. This solution also prevents the possibility of lab accidents, which can occur if shortcuts such as extension cords or tubes were employed instead.

Reason 8: Simplify Cleaning

Accidents happen. Spills can be hazardous, be it the chemicals or the broken containers. It is critical that any cleanup be timely, thorough and complete. With standard furniture or even some dedicated lab furniture, cleanup is difficult because the lab benches are impossible to move and it is tricky to be certain that the spill was completely removed. With mobile lab furniture, it’s easy and straightforward to move the instrument or even the entire system, clean all sides of the IonBench thoroughly, then return the instruments to their proper location and resume work quickly and efficiently.

Have we convinced you of the many benefits of mobile lab furniture? If you still have questions or are ready to get started, please contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233. He can discuss your specific lab situation and offer suggestions on how to best configure dedicated lab furniture in your lab.

Some Reasons You Need Mobile Lab Furniture

Where would we be without our mobile phones? We can keep in touch with loved ones and coworkers, do research, choose restaurants, pay for nearly everything—all from the convenience of our phones, wherever we are. This gives us maximum flexibility in living busy lives. Mobility is a key concept these days—and it applies to your lab as well. With mobile lab furniture, you have maximum flexibility in keeping a busy lab working smoothly, safely and efficiently.

Not so sure about that? Here are four reasons why you need mobile lab furniture like our IonBenches.

Reason 1: Simplify Service

How many times have you performed calisthenics in your lab, trying to get at the back of an instrument in order to perform service or routine maintenance, or check that wires and cords aren’t being pinched? Some labs solve this problem by leaving a service corridor behind all the dedicated lab furniture. What they make up for in convenience, however, they lose in space because that 12- to-18-inch corridor is a waste of valuable space in a cramped lab.

However, if your dedicated lab furniture comes with casters, you can keep your mobile lab furniture against the wall (where it’s also more stable and less likely to be knocked over if someone bumps into it). With IonBench, you can safely, easily move the entire system away from the wall whenever you need to access the back of the unit.

Reason 2: Take Your System to the Process

Process optimization often requires fast turnarounds. With mobile lab furniture, you don’t have to draw samples and then get them delivered to the lab in a timely fashion. Instead, take your entire MS system to the processing point and complete the entire procedure in one place. By utilizing mobile lab furniture, you can keep utilities and peripheral instruments safely connected and simplify at-source monitoring.

Reason 3: Optimize Peripheral Placement

Workflow is key to an organized and efficient lab. While it’s great to have your mass spec mobilized on one of our IonBenches, don’t forget the peripherals. When you move your LC closer to the source, you can improve throughput by as much as 10%. With mobile lab furniture, it’s easy to move that LC back out of the way when it’s not needed, or easily connect it with another process in a different part of the lab.

Reason 4: Rearrange Your Lab Whenever You Need

A significant challenge to efficiency is rapidly changing priorities. In order to prioritize customer service, it’s frequently necessary to reorganize workflow and process priorities. With mobile lab furniture, it’s easy to accommodate those changes by simply moving systems and peripherals around the lab, and even around the building. When your dedicated lab furniture doesn’t move, it’s much more difficult to imagine reconfiguring your lab to meet evolving needs.

If these four reasons haven’t fully convinced you of the mobile lab furniture benefits, stay tuned. In our next post, we’ll share four more reasons why your dedicated lab furniture should come with strong casters attached. Meanwhile, we invite you to contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233 to discuss how your lab might best be configured with dedicated lab furniture.

Not All Dedicated Lab Furniture is Built the Same Way

There are many reasons why a lab work space is different than that of your typical work environment. Most don’t handle dangerous chemicals on a regular basis, for example. Nor are they noisy, sometimes chaotic environments with loud instruments that are heavy enough to cause bodily harm. For those reasons and more, we believe labs should always be treated differently than other work environments—and that includes the furniture used.

Strong, resistant dedicated lab furniture is key for safety and efficiency in a lab. But once you start shopping for lab benches, you will discover there are differences in what’s available. We get a lot of questions about what makes our dedicated lab furniture different from the rest. Read on to find out the answers, based on information provided by our IonBench expert, Tim Hawkins.

Chem-res: Not Your Average Laminate

Whether it’s on television crime shows or in your own lab, you’ll find that the typical color of lab bench surfaces is black. That color isn’t there to make a fashion statement. It’s the result of constructing the benches with Chem-res, a specially designed epoxy resin that’s universally recognized and accepted by staff and researchers around the world. Chem-res actually comes in a number of different formulas, each manufactured to stand up to the particular needs of certain lab situations.

When shopping for dedicated lab furniture, don’t assume every black laminate is Chem-res. Ask to be sure. Also, explain what specific substances your lab bench surface needs to be protected from, and the instrument weights the bench will need to withstand. If you’re not satisfied with the answers, contact Tim Hawkins at 1-888-669-1233.

Upgrading Dedicated Lab Furniture with Trespa

But that just scratches the surface (ahem). If you need your mass spectrometry lab furniture to withstand high acid exposure on a regular basis, we can further improve your IonBench. For example, if your research involves inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we can easily customize your bench by exchanging the Chem-res surface for one made of acid-resistant Trespa.

Why We Avoid Metal in Our Mass Spectrometry Benches

Something else that makes IonBenches different in the world of dedicated lab furniture is that we minimize metal in their construction.

Metals, being good conductors, also transmit vibrations. When you’re working with sensitive instruments, such as mass spectrometry technology, vibrations shorten the life of those machines.

For this reason, we manufacture our IonBench MS with laminated wood. Not only is this material strong enough to support the weight of mass spectrometry instruments, but it’s also capable of absorbing vibrations, keeping your instruments tuned to the peak of efficiency.

As you can see, many considerations go into each component of a good lab bench (to learn more, click here). Plus, every aspect of our IonBenches is carefully constructed to meet the particular needs of mass spectrometry.

To learn more about our IonBenches and ask Tim Hawkins your questions, contact him at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233.

Answering Your Questions: Why Dedicated Lab Furniture Is Worth the Price

As you might imagine, we get a lot of questions from lab managers and other professionals who are researching furniture for their labs. First-time buyers of dedicated lab furniture for mass spectrometry, HPLC, and related instruments often bring up some excellent points. Tim Hawkins, our IonBench expert, hears one question frequently: “Why can’t I build a good MS bench myself?” Read on, for our multi-part answer to this commonly asked question.

Yes, You Could, But…

The short answer to the above question is, “Well, actually you could build something similar yourself.” You could go to your local home improvement warehouse store, pick up similar, but likely less quality materials, and construct a basic piece of lab furniture on your own. You could build a sturdy table and make it the size and shape you need for the portion of your lab that’s set aside for mass spectrometry. You might even save a little money in the process.

However, there’s a lot more to developing a reliable and safe piece of dedicated lab furniture than what we just mentioned—which is why our IonBenches cost more than what you might build yourself.

Designing the Best Dedicated Lab Furniture

Let’s begin by talking about the design. We’ve seen a lot of labs in action and we understand how to make our IonBenches function efficiently in any lab configuration or situation. We know what types of electrical and other connections need to be included in the design and where they should enter and exit the bench without getting in the way of the mass spectrometer or becoming pinched or rubbed when the bench is moved.

We understand that mass spectrometry involves supporting the significant weight of these instruments while also allowing you to safely move your instrument around the lab. This is why we build our MS benches with strong, sturdy caster wheels—to keep your benches mobile and your procedures always moving forward.

Using the Right Materials for Mass Spectrometry

The materials used in our dedicated lab furniture—like those caster wheels—are another key component of our successful IonBenches. Mass spectrometry involves heat, oil, and a lot of noise from the roughing pumps. If you build a basic cabinet with materials from a home improvement store, you’re potentially introducing lab safety hazards that could result in a fire or accident.

For example, not all foams and laminates—and the glues that hold them—are up to the task. Can those materials tolerate the heat that is generated by roughing pumps? Remember, those pumps have to be put in some kind of insulated cabinet in order to keep lab noise down to a workable—and safe—level. Basic residential foam insulation and laminate choices also may not be able to handle the oils and various chemicals found in modern labs.

Valuing Expertise and Experience

There is a final reason why we believe you should leave the building of dedicated lab furniture to the experts. Just as expertise is key to the success of your lab procedures, the same is true with the building of lab benches.

As research professionals, you have been trained to run samples or manage the people who do. Through your education and experience, you have learned what’s required to run a lab in a safe and efficient manner. But chances are that education and experience, while considerable, didn’t include learning how to construct reliable, safe, and efficient lab benches. In other words, you’re better off spending time doing the things you’re paid to do.

In the end, it comes down to efficiency as much as anything else: Why spend your time and energy attempting to do something you haven’t been trained to do when you can instead rely on the dedicated lab furniture professionals at IonBench, who are experts in their field?

To discuss more of the advantages of our mass spectrometry furniture—or ask any other questions you may have—Tim Hawkins will be glad to help you. Please reach out to him at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 1-888-669-1233.

Why Modular Lab Design Concepts Make Sense for Any Lab

Trends come and go—and it can be beneficial to understand the reasons behind the rise and fall of new ideas.

One of the hottest new developments is modularity. This trend began with government requests for modular lab units that could be easily packed up and shipped to new locations as needs changed.

While you might not need to pack up your lab for delivery to the newest natural disaster or environmental testing site, many of the principles behind this trend can be useful for our own lab design, especially for the purposes of renovation or expansion.

Modular Lab Design: Adapting to Changing Demands

One reason to embrace the concepts behind modular lab design is that they facilitate adaptability. Equipment, task, and mission changes occur frequently, and a modular approach to lab design allows managers to more easily and efficiently adapt to those changing demands.

Also, with a modular approach, renovations can more easily replace outdated facilities and equipment. Localizing vacuum systems, installing ductless fume hoods, and upgrading to movable dedicated lab furniture all contribute to a lab design that’s easier to modify as needs change.

Dedicated Lab Furniture Designed for Safety

With the right dedicated lab furniture, your modular approach to lab design provides additional benefits. Lab safety, for instance, is always a key consideration. Every module must connect with the next in a pattern that allows for free and easy movement between portions of the lab—and out the doors in the case of an accident.

Our IonBenches come on caster wheels so that they can be easily moved around the lab, even with heavy, expensive mass spectrometry equipment installed on top. Well-placed dedicated lab furniture also ensures that technicians don’t bump into each other at critical moments due to awkwardly positioned or inferior furniture.

The Flexibility of Modular Design

Beyond addressing lab safety concerns, lab furniture should also be specifically designed to meet the dynamic, changing needs of busy labs. In the same way that modular configurations accommodate the particular needs of specific researchers or projects, our IonBenches can be quickly moved to address new parameters or requirements. Plus, our custom additions provide additional storage drawers and specialized hardware for mounting computers and other instruments.

Choose the Right Partner for Your Project

Whether you are creating a modular lab design from scratch or looking to refresh an aging lab to meet present-day demands, finding the right information can be a challenge. Often, a simple online comparison won’t allow you to sufficiently determine the best fit between your particular lab design needs and the lab furniture available.

That’s why you should contact our expert, Tim Hawkins. He specializes in understanding the needs of modern labs, including the trend toward modular lab designs, and can help you with dedicated lab furniture that will meet your needs now and, in the years—and lab design changes—ahead. Contact Tim at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233 today to discuss your specific requirements.

Sound vs. Noise and When is Lab Safety Impacted?

Sounds are everywhere. Every environment on Earth has them. Some are natural, such as birds chirping or cicadas droning. Others are generated by the devices we humans have created. Both types of sounds, regardless of what causes them, can become an annoyance or even a danger depending on the circumstances.

That’s why sound—and particularly noise— represents a lab safety challenge and why we have carefully crafted our IonBench dedicated lab furniture to address noise safety concerns.

The Difference Between Sound and Noise

While you might not think of it in this manner, there is a simple way to distinguish between noise and sound: Noise is sound that you don’t wish to hear. To put it another way, when you have decided a sound is an annoyance, you should now classify it as noise.

Take, for example, jazz music being played in a lab. To some, it may be a beautiful sound. To others, who might need silence in order to focus on a demanding task or analysis, it might be classified as distracting noise. For still others, who might have relegated the sound of the music to background status, a sudden change in volume could result in startled surprise, perhaps resulting in a jerk of the hand or the head. In barely any time at all, that innocuous sound could have become noise that precipitates a lab safety incident.

How Noise Safety Definitions Vary

With so many subjective factors involved, it’s no surprise that definitions of what constitutes noise can vary. Individuals differ in their internal—often subconscious—understanding of what makes sound become noise. This can cause conflict in a lab. When one person’s sound is another person’s noise, noise safety discussions can become increasingly heated (potentially becoming noise safety hazards in and of themselves).

Consequently, it’s important to create a culture surrounding sound and noise that allows for individual differences. Attaching different definitions to elements of sound can help those discussions find common ground.

The 3 Physical Characteristics of Sound

There are three physical characteristics of sound that can be used to develop practical parameters for the discussion of noise safety:

Intensity: The magnitude of a sound, measured in decibels (dBA), delineates intensity.

Frequency: Sound frequency is more commonly referred to as tone or pitch and is measured in hertz. High-frequency sounds are often considered more annoying, while low-frequency sounds are perceived as being louder.

Temporality: Sounds vary in terms of fluctuation, continuity, and constancy or intermittence. A sound that varies in its temporal pattern is usually perceived as louder, because it has surprised the listener (as in the change of volume example noted earlier).

Addressing Lab Safety with Dedicated Lab Furniture

In many environments, various sounds can be used to drown out other sounds (such as when lab technicians use music to disguise the sound—experienced as noise—of mass spectrometry vacuum pumps or fume hoods). While this can be effective for some people, it creates potential lab safety issues when the total volume of noise increases beyond an acceptable or tolerable level for others.

Addressing such noise safety concerns is one of the reasons we created our IonBench MS, which comes with vacuum pump enclosures that guarantee a 15 dBA reduction in perceived noise. To learn more about this dedicated lab furniture and our commitment to noise safety in the lab, please contact Tim Hawkins at tim.hawkins@farhawk.com or 888-669-1233.

Lab Renovations: How to Minimize Disruptions and Increase Efficiency

Disruptions in the workplace are always costly, regardless of whether they’re planned for or not. When it’s time to begin lab renovations or relocation, you can pretty much guarantee lost time and efficiency, distracted staff, and increased frustrations.

Fortunately, there are steps you can take to minimize the effects of those disruptions. Knowing what to look out for—and planning accordingly—can be half the battle.

Involve the Right People

Successful lab renovations depend upon thorough communication. This means involving personnel from all levels of the organization. Senior managers provide broader perspective and an understanding of laboratory goals. Experienced scientists provide a detailed understanding of lab functionality and utilization needs. And middle management brings its unique perspective—plus a careful eye on the budgetary bottom line.

If all levels of personnel aren’t involved, or if they come and go over the course of a long project, important voices can be missed when critical decisions are made.

For example, does your new lab design need to support a siloed or collaborative work environment? Is there mass spectrometry equipment that needs to easily fit through multiple doorways and around corners? Questions like these, and many more, can affect the design and functionality of your remodeled lab and cause problems if they are not appropriately considered.

Document and Verify Existing Lab Structures and Dedicated Lab Furniture

Lab renovations can be tricky in that sometimes assumptions are made, which—absent independent verification—can result in costly mistakes down the road.

Say, for example, that the floor plan for an initial renovation project indicated that lab gas was being piped to each workstation. Designers toured the existing facility but didn’t move the lab furniture to confirm the piping, since all the furniture had been bolted to the floor to increase stability. When the tear-down begins, workers then discover gas canisters behind lab benches and learn from staff that the piping was never installed due to lack of funds.

Such a discovery could result in more complications, and possibly more expenses. What if the new lab layout didn’t allow space for gas canisters behind every workstation, or the new lab furniture had no accommodation for canisters? Certainly the cost to install a new piping system or add an external storage room would contribute to the cost of your lab renovations.

To avoid such problems, gather as much up-front documentation and information as possible. Surveys, 3-D laser scanning, and interviews with informed stakeholders, like on-site facility managers, can provide crucial details that might otherwise be missed.

Also, from a long-range perspective, investing in moveable dedicated lab furniture can be beneficial. The IonBench, for example, with its strong, lockable caster wheels, not only offers more flexibility for varying lab layouts but also makes it easy to move your mass spectrometers and other equipment when planning a new lab configuration.

Upgrade HVAC Systems

Lab renovations are usually precipitated by a change in scope or increase in demand. If the HVAC needs of the upgraded facility are not taken into account, however, efficiency can suffer—possibly on a catastrophic scale, in the case of a systems failure. HVAC upgrades need to address not just the power needs of additional equipment but also the heat mitigation of those instruments.

With change, however, also comes opportunity. Lab renovations can reveal possibilities for collaboration, such as the opportunity for two teams to share a single, infrequently used instrument, thus decreasing its heat generation by a factor of two. And when positioned on moveable lab furniture, that instrument could be rolled easily and safely from one lab to another.

Maintain Operations During Lab Renovations

Inevitably, construction work will cause disruption during a renovation. Careful planning and thorough communication, however, can ensure that renovations are minimally invasive and do not occur during critical phases of particular projects.

Asking questions is key. What would be the impact if water or gas was shut off during the workday? How can the noise and dust of demolition be minimized? What renovations will lead to off-gassing that might affect staff and instrumentation? Can some projects be moved to a secondary location during lab renovations?

Questions like these are helpful, and we have an expert who knows what to ask. Tim Hawkins has the experience to walk you through what needs to be done in advance, helping you customize dedicated lab furniture for your renovation while guiding you along the steps toward a finished lab. Contact him today at 1-888-669-1233 or tim.hawkins@farhawk.com.

Purchasing a Mass Spec Lab Bench? Start Here

Ordering a new mass spectrometer is a big investment in the future of your lab. Since mass spec technology is constantly evolving, it’s inevitable that you’ll eventually find yourself ordering one—if not this year, then soon.

Therefore, we want to help you think proactively so that your new mass spec hits the lab ready to roll—and that includes having the right dedicated lab furniture ready to support it.

Timing Is Everything

We regularly get calls from lab managers telling us they need to order one of our lab benches for immediate delivery because their new mass spec will be arriving in just a week. Our response is usually that such a thing is possible, but it won’t be very efficient or cost-effective.

That’s because our dedicated lab furniture is crafted in France and then shipped to North America. We can deliver one of our standard lab benches in just a week, but that involves something which can be tough on the budget – priority overseas shipping by air.

To make your purchase as cost-effective as possible, we recommend thinking about your lab furniture needs once your mass spec budget is initially approved and before the order is placed.

Customizing Your New Dedicated Lab Furniture

Another reason to plan purchases of lab benches as early as possible is that the added time ensures you’re better able to have important customizations built into your lab furniture. For instance, some mass spectrometry researchers like to have a CPU attached to the side of their bench and a flat-screen monitor arm attached to the top. We can also install keyboard trays, drawers, and even dedicated solvent waste modules.

We also pay special attention to the noise reduction capabilities of our vacuum pump enclosures—this depends on the mass spec you will be installing. If you’re using two Varian/Agilent MS40+ or Leybold Sogevac SV65 pumps, for example, you need to order our NE78 enclosure. If you will have Edwards pumps, on the other hand, you’ll need to order our NE58 vacuum pump enclosure.

We can also install heat removal modules or virtually any custom modification—but we need eight weeks to make those modifications in France and then ship the lab benches for installation in your lab.

Measure Twice, Install Lab Benches Once

Another key component of an efficient MS installation is making sure that the MS, your new lab bench, will fit through every hallway, around every corner, through every doorway, and into their new home in your lab.

We suggest you walk the route with your facilities manager, from loading dock to the mass spec’s desired location. Carefully measure every tight corner and doorway (including your freight elevators, if your lab is on an upper floor) to make certain that both your dedicated lab furniture and your new mass spec can safely make the trip.

You may want to speak with your receiving dock associates to determine whether the IonBench may be unpacked on the dock, and the shipping materials disposed. Many facilities are not able to do this, and we can help with third party “white glove” services, if required.

It’s also important to measure distances within your lab. If you purchase an IonBench with caster wheels, intending to move it around, will you be able to do so in the tight confines of your lab? Are all electrical outlets located close enough to the mass spec’s new location, and are they rated for the task? Is there enough room, and/or venting outlets, around your various lab benches for vacuum pump heat to efficiently dissipate without causing any problems?

There’s a lot to consider when you’re investing in a new mass spec, and not all of those issues are financial. That’s why we suggest that your first step be to contact Tim Hawkins, our IonBench expert, at 1-888-669-1233. He can provide additional purchasing tips about lab benches and answer questions about your particular situation.